International Journal of Yoga, Physiotherapy and Physical Education

International Journal of Yoga, Physiotherapy and Physical Education


International Journal of Yoga, Physiotherapy and Physical Education
International Journal of Yoga, Physiotherapy and Physical Education
Vol. 5, Issue 5 (2020)

Drug abuse in Sports and Physical activity


Krishna Gopal Rai, Surendra Kumar

Simply stated, the use of performance-enhancing drugs in sports and in exercise constitutes “doping.” Doping is cheating, and it undermines the fundamental spirit of sports by eroding its integrity, image, and values. Although doping has long plagued elite sports, it has escalated to the point that most authorities think that few levels of sports are immune. Many athletes serve as wonderful, clean role models for children and adolescents, but high-profile athletes who cheat encourage the use of steroids, supplements, stimulants, and narcotics among young athletes. Despite progress in drug testing, challenges remain in addressing this important health and ethical issue. The reasons an athlete might choose to dope vary. Many physicians attempt to deter athletes from cheating by educating them about the physical, psychosocial, legal, and ethical consequences of drug use. However, some physicians rationalize that “supervising” doping behavior renders this practice safer, despite no supporting evidence. Physicians who aid and abet doping practices violate the Hippocratic Oath and the policies of most sports and exercise organizations. Considerations emerging from the congress that might be helpful for sports medicine and other concerned health care practitioners include the Urge your medical organization to take action if physicians and other health care practitioners are over treating “growth” deficiency or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or are inappropriately prescribing testosterone and stimulants. Ask athletes in your medical practice to commit to seeking your advice on the use of dietary supplements or medication, noting that your advice will be documented in their records. Ask coaching and training staff to sign a similar agreement that they will not provide nutritional supplements or vitamin products to athletes or counsel their use without your consent. By engaging in some activities, physicians will be part of a collaborative effort to promote the opportunity for all children, adolescents, young athletes, and exercisers to participate and compete fairly in clean sports and athletic performance.
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How to cite this article:
Krishna Gopal Rai, Surendra Kumar. Drug abuse in Sports and Physical activity. International Journal of Yoga, Physiotherapy and Physical Education, Volume 5, Issue 5, 2020, Pages 21-23
International Journal of Yoga, Physiotherapy and Physical Education